what it means to dance like a spanish woman

Carmen is a woman from Sevilla, the south of Spain, and her personality has been always related to the power of flamenco. I am Spanish and I don’t like the flamenco so much. It’s just a stereotype of our traditions and culture. However, this dance is a part of our nation and it’s very well known all over the world. Levels and edges are important, but Tessa will need to know about Spain and the flamenco in order to skate the free dance well, a dance set to Carmen.

We cannot understand what the flamenco is without understanding a Spanish woman’s feelings. It is all about anger, pain and tears for the lost love who will never come back. She is living for that lost love and dying for it at the same time. That anger is what we all hear when a flamenco dancer taps her feet onto the floor. The more noise we hear, the more pain she feels inside.

That reminds me of a film I saw a while ago in which a British woman decides to attend flamenco classes. The teacher, a Spanish flamingo dancer, tries to explain to all the students in the class what flamenco means to a woman―I guess no one could understand her! Here you have a clip of the film so you can see the teacher’s frustration when she realizes that she is misunderstood. Pay attention at the last minute in the clip:



“Where is the passion? Where is the revenge? Where is the blood? This is flamenco! That clapping, so polite…it’s like the end of the opera.” Tessa needs to get that and bring it to the ice.

This helps me to remember a Spanish flamenco singer, Estrella Morente, when her father died about a year ago. She appeared next to her father’s coffin to say good bye to him. Then, all of a sudden, she sang her last song for him―amazingly painful. You don’t need to understand Spanish to know the suffering of Estrella at that time. She sang with so much anger and pain that last song. Just check it out and you all will get the idea:



Basically, these two examples express the feelings of a Spanish woman and the flamenco’s culture. I really hope Tessa can be inspired by Spain as she plays her role in Carmen. I am sure she will do it because she is such an enormous artist.

Thank you so much for reading!

By Laura Blanco Picó

4 comments:

seyi1205 said...

This is very informative, thanks to Laura for doing the write-up and thank you Misha for posting it!

iggie said...

Thanks

Anonymous said...

Thanks for letting me write for your blog, Iggie!! hope u all like the text! xx

iggie said...

You're welcome